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Consciousness and the ego

Excerpted from ‘A Course in Miracles’:

Consciousness, the level of perception, was the first split introduced into the mind after the separation, making the mind a perceiver rather than a creator.  Consciousness is correctly identified as the domain of the ego.  The ego is a wrong-minded attempt to perceive yourself as you wish to be, rather than as you are.  Yet you can know yourself only as you are, because that is all you can be sure of.  Everything else is open to question.

Conceptually, the ‘separation’ referred to can be thought of as our inward turn into our minds, leaving our bodies behind.  Our total intelligence would be our minds plus the body where the ‘mind’ as we perceive it is just something that observes thoughts and whatever else it perceives.  It cannot think.  We are currently existing in a state of not consciously thinking.   Conscious thinking would involve understanding the thought behind all of our actions and the fact the we deliberated those thoughts, then decided to take the action.  The action is whatever we are doing here.  The un-perceived thought came from our non-physical selves.  The decision to act on the thought came from our non-physical body/intelligence self that we are not even aware of.  Insanity describes this condition.

Earth is a mirror of the non-physical.  Our non-physical bodies resemble our Earth type bodies.  We are completely disassociated from our non-physical selves and are existing in a form of psychosis, or insanity.  We exist within our imagination, completely made up versions of ourselves.  Our Earth lives are intended to reconnect us to our non-physical selves.  This is the spiritual journey of self-acceptance.  Our ‘fall’ was brought about by a rejection of our God given selves in favor of an image of ourselves we create.  We cannot walk away into ‘heaven’, reconnected as a sane being u till we fully accept ourselves as we are, not as we wish to be.  Until then we are flailing around in a form of insanity and unawareness resulting from the disassociation with our actual selves.

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Excerpt: A Course in Miracles – Mind vs Body

  

This excerpt is from lesson 96 of the book, A Course in Miracles.  It helps, when trying to understand something and remember it, to write it down as you think.  This way, your body is participating in the thinking, taking it out of the mind and making you, in a way, act out the thoughts, anchoring it in reality.  Note: caps seem to refer to subjects residing in the non-physical.

  
Although you are one self, you experience yourself as two; as both good and evil, loving and hating, mind and body.  This sense of being split into opposites induces feelings of acute and constant conflict, and leads to frantic attempts to reconcile the contradictory aspects of this self-perception.  You have sought many such solutions, and none of them has worked.  The opposites you see in you will never be compatible.  But one exists.

The fact that truth and illusion cannot be reconciled, no matter how you try, what means you use and where you see the problem, must be accepted if you would be saved.  Until you have accepted this, you will attempt an endless list of goals you cannot reach; a senseless series of expenditures of time and effort, hopefulness and doubt, each one as futile as the one before, and failing as the next one surely will.

Problems that have no meaning cannot be revealed within the framework they are set.  Two selves in conflict could not be resolved, and good and evil have no meeting place. The self you made can never be your Self, nor can your Self be split in two, and still be what It is and must forever be.  A mind and body cannot both exist.  Make no attempt to reconcile the two, for one denies the other can be real.  If you are physical, your mind is gone from your self-concept, for it has no place in which it could be really part of you.  If you are spirit, then the body must be meaningless in your reality.

Spirit makes use of mind as means to find its Self expression.  And the mind which serves the spirit is at peace and filled with joy.  Its power comes from spirit, and it is fulfilling happily it function here.  Yet mind can also see itself divorced from spirit, and perceive itself within a body it confuses with itself.  Without its function then it has no peace, and happiness is alien to its thoughts.

Yet mind apart from spirit cannot think.  It has denied its Source of strength, and sees itself as helpless, limited and weak.  Dissociated from its function now, it thinks it is alone and separate, attacked by armies massed against itself and hiding in the body’s frail support.  Now must it reconcile unlike with like, for this is what it thinks it is for.

Waste no more time on this.  Who can resolve the senseless conflicts which a dream presents?  What could the resolution mean in truth?  What purpose could it serve?  What is it for?  Salvation cannot make illusions real, nor solve a problem that does not exist.  Perhaps you hope it can.  Yet would you have God’s plan for the release of His dear Son bring pain to him, and fail to set him free?

Your Self retains Its [own] Thoughts, and they remain within your mind and in the Mind of God.  The Holy Spirit holds salvation in your mind, and offers it the way to peace.  Salvation is a thought you share with God, because His Voice accepted it for you and answered in your name that it was done.  This is salvation kept among the Thoughts your Self holds dear and cherishes for you.

We will attempt today to find this thought, whose presence in your mind is guaranteed by Him Who speaks to you from your one Self. [See How A Guide May Be Set Up].  Our hourly five-minute practicing will be a search for Him within your mind.  Salvation comes from this one Self through Him Who is the Bridge between your mind and It.  Wait patiently, and let Him speak to you about your Self, and what your mind can do, restored to It and free to serve Its Will.

Begin with saying this: 

Salvation comes from my one Self.  Its Thoughts are mine to use.

Then seek Its Thoughts and claim them as your own.  These are your own real thoughts you have denied, and let your mind go wandering in a world of dreams, to find illusions in their place.  Here are your thoughts, the only ones you have.  Salvation is among them; find it here.
If you succeed, the thoughts that come to you will tell you you are saved, and that your mind has found the function that it sought to lose.  Your Self will welcome it and give it peace.  Restored in strength, it will again flow out from spirit to the spirit in all things created by the Spirit as Itself.  Your mind will bless all things.  Confusion done, you are restored, for you have found your Self.

Your Self knows that you cannot fail today.  Perhaps your mind remains uncertain yet a little while.  Be not dismayed by this.  The joy your Self experiences It will save for you, and it will yet be yours in full awareness.  Every time you spend five minutes of the hour seeking Him Who joins your mind and Self, you offer Him another treasure to be kept for you.

Each time today you tell your frantic mind salvation comes from your one [True] Self, you lay another treasure in your growing store.  And all of it is given everyone who asks for it, and wil accept the gift.  Think, then, how much is given unto you to give this day, that it be given you!

Casting Crowns: Life Song Lyrics

Lyrics

Empty hands held high
Such small sacrifice

If not joined with my life

I sing in vain tonight
May the words I say

And the things I do

Make my lifesong sing

Bring a smile to You
Let my lifesong sing to You

Let my lifesong sing to You

I want to sign Your name to the end of this day

Knowing that my heart was true

Let my lifesong sing to You
Lord, I give my life

A living sacrifice

To reach a world in need

To be Your hands and feet
So may the words I say

And the things I do

Make my lifesong sing

Bring a smile to you
Let my lifesong sing to You

Let my lifesong sing to You

I want to sign Your name to the end of this day

Knowing that my heart was true

Let my lifesong sing to You
Hallelujah

Hallelujah

Let my lifesong sing to You
Hallelujah

Hallelujah

Let my lifesong sing to You
Hallelujah

Hallelujah

Let my lifesong sing to You
Let my lifesong sing to You

Let my lifesong sing to You

I want to sign Your name to the end of this day

Knowing that my heart was true

Let my lifesong sing to You
Let my lifesong sing to You

Let my lifesong sing to You

Let my lifesong sing to You (Jesus, let my lifelong sing to You)

I want to sign Your name to the end of this day

Knowing that my heart was true

Let my lifesong sing to You

Science Humor

  
Excerpted from The Guardian

 

🔻 An electron and a positron go into a bar.

Positron: “You’re round.”
Electron: “Are you sure?”
Positron: “I’m positive.”

I think I heard this on Radio 4 after the publication of a record (small) measurement of the electron electric dipole moment – often explained as the roundness of the electron – by Jony Hudson et al in Nature 2011.
Joanna Haigh, professor of atmospheric physics, Imperial College, London

🔻 Why did Erwin Schrödinger, Paul Dirac and Wolfgang Pauli work in very small garages? Because they were quantum mechanics. 
Lloyd Peck, professor, British Antarctic Survey

🔻 A new monk shows up at a monastery where the monks spend their time making copies of ancient books. The new monk goes to the basement of the monastery saying he wants to make copies of the originals rather than of others’ copies so as to avoid duplicating errors they might have made. Several hours later the monks, wondering where their new friend is, find him crying in the basement. They ask him what is wrong and he says “the word is CELEBRATE, not CELIBATE!”
I first heard this maybe more than 10 years ago in conjunction with the general theme of “copying errors” or mutations in biology.
Mark Pagel, professor of biological sciences, University of Reading

🔻 A blowfly goes into a bar and asks: “Is that stool taken?”

No idea where I got this from! 
Amoret Whitaker, entomologist, Natural History Museum

🔻 A weed scientist goes into a shop. He asks: “Hey, you got any of that inhibitor of 3-phosphoshikimate-carboxyvinyl transferase? Shopkeeper: “You mean Roundup?” Scientist: “Yeah, that’s it. I can never remember that dang name.”

Made up by and first told by me. 
John A Pickett, scientific leader of chemical ecology, Rothamsted Research

🔻 A psychoanalyst shows a patient an inkblot, and asks him what he sees. The patient says: “A man and woman making love.” The psychoanalyst shows him a second inkblot, and the patient says: “That’s also a man and woman making love.” The psychoanalyst says: “You are obsessed with sex.” The patient says: “What do you mean I am obsessed? You are the one with all the dirty pictures.”

I have no idea where I first heard this joke. I suspect when I was an undergraduate and was first taught about Freudian psychology.
Richard Wiseman, professor of public understanding of psychology, University of Hertfordshire

Read more at The Guardian

Footprints in the Sand

Related to my blog post, An Example of How A Guide Can Be Set Up,

http://bit.ly/1w9sJWk

One night I dreamed a dream.
As I was walking along the beach with my Lord.
Across the dark sky flashed scenes from my life.
For each scene, I noticed two sets of footprints in the sand,
One belonging to me and one to my Lord.

After the last scene of my life flashed before me,
I looked back at the footprints in the sand.
I noticed that at many times along the path of my life,
especially at the very lowest and saddest times,
there was only one set of footprints.

This really troubled me, so I asked the Lord about it. 
“Lord, you said once I decided to follow you,
You’d walk with me all the way.
But I noticed that during the saddest and most troublesome times of my life,
there was only one set of footprints.
I don’t understand why, when I needed You the most, You would leave me.” 

He whispered, “My precious child, I love you and will never leave you
Never, ever, during your trials and testings.
When you saw only one set of footprints,
It was then that I carried you.”

See http://bit.ly/1gpDEwz

Excerpt: Quantum Mysticism: Gone But Not Forgotten

Quantum Mechanics

Here is an excerpt from the phys.org site which takes a look at the spiritual philosophies of the scientists who began the study of quantum mechanics.

Does mysticism have a place in quantum mechanics today, or is the idea that the mind plays a role in creating reality best left to philosophical meditations? Harvard historian Juan Miguel Marin argues the former – not because physicists today should account for consciousness in their research, but because knowing the early history of the philosophical ideas in quantum mechanics is essential for understanding the theory on a fundamental level.

Mind Matters

The controversy boils down to the age-old question of the nature of reality. As Einstein (a firm realist) once asked, does the moon exist only when looked at? Although such a viewpoint seems unlikely in our everyday lives, in quantum mechanics, physicists’ observations can sometimes affect what they’re observing on a quantum scale. As the famous Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics argues, we cannot speak about an objective reality other than that which is revealed through measurement and observation.

As Marin explains, the debate of consciousness in quantum theory began around 1927 when Einstein accused Neils Bohr of introducing a mysticism incompatible with science. Bohr denied the accusation and blamed it on Einstein misunderstanding him when he said that humans are both actors and observers in the world. Yet while Bohr believed that quantum processes occurred without the need for observers, he also sympathized with the idea that an extension of quantum theory might help in understanding consciousness.

Einstein, for his part, adamantly opposed any subjectivity in science. He disagreed with Bohr’s view that it is unscientific to inquire whether or not Schrödinger’s cat in a box is alive or dead before an observation is made. Einstein devoted much of his later life to searching for elements of reality to make quantum mechanics a theory based on realism. For instance, the EPR paradox (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox) thought experiment in 1935 attempted to restore realism and causality to the theory.

On the other hand, Wolfgang Pauli truly did harbor some of the views that Einstein accused Bohr of. Pauli favored a hypothesis of “lucid mysticism,” a synthesis between rationality and religion. He speculated that quantum theory could unify the psychological/scientific and philosophical/mystical approaches to consciousness. Pauli’s perspective was influenced by the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, whose views on reality were in turn influenced by Eastern religions.

Still other physicists had different views. Marin argues that Max Planck, an adherent of Christianity, framed the controversy as the objectivity of science and Christianity against the mysticism of Schopenhauer and his popularization of Buddhism and Hinduism. Planck considered religion (Christianity) and science compatible based on his opinion that they are both based on objectivity but refer to distinct facets of reality. Meanwhile, Paul Dirac rejected any kind of religious vocabulary, arguing that “religion is a jumble of false assertions with no basis in reality.”

The mysticism controversy also expanded into the public realm, starting in 1929 with first astrophysicist Arthur Eddington’s popular book The Nature of the Physical World. Although the book distorted many concepts, his defense of mysticism caught the attention of the international media. (Eddington was most famous for confirming Einstein’s theory of relativity by measuring an eclipse, which catapulted Einstein into fame.)

In the next few years Werner Heisenberg and Erwin Schrödinger leaned toward the side of mysticism, irritating Einstein and Planck. For others, the choice was not clear cut. Marin argues that the mathematician John Von Neumann intentionally used ambiguous terms when discussing the philosophy of quantum equations, meaning he could fit on either side. “He was a genius at linguistic innovation and came up with German terms that could support many different interpretations,” Marin said.

In 1958, Schrödinger, inspired by Schopenhauer from youth, published his lectures Mind and Matter. Here he argued that there is a difference between measuring instruments and human observation: a thermometer’s registration cannot be considered an act of observation, as it contains no meaning in itself. Thus, consciousness is needed to make physical reality meaningful. As Schrödinger concluded, “Some of you, I am sure, will call this mysticism. So with all due acknowledgement to the fact that physical theory is at all times relative, in that it depends on certain basic assumptions, we may, or so I believe, assert that physical theory in its present stage strongly suggests the indestructibility of Mind by Time.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news163670588.html#jCp

For fun, (from Physics & Metaphysics)

Quantum Physics (Simplified)

Your consciousness affects the behavior of subatomic particles.

Particles move backwards as well as forwards in time,

and appear in all possible places at once.

The universe splits into parallel universes in which all possible events may occur.

Quantum Physics (Even More Simplified)

Question: “Is an electron a wave or a particle?”
Answer: “Yes”

Question: “Is the electron here or is it there?”
Answer: “Yes”

Question: “Which came first; the chicken or the egg?”
Answer: “Yes”

Excerpt: Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious

Carl Jung

From Chapter 3 of An Introduction to Jung’s Psychology

Chapter 3

Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious

The development of an attitude, either extraverted or introverted, and a function, is part of the process of living, of adapting ourselves to our world and making our mark in it. Unless there is some strong interference, we develop along the lines that are easiest to us, but we also like to ‘put our best foot foremost’. This means that we usually develop our best function, be it thinking or intuition, feeling or sensation, and at the same time have a strong tendency to conform to what is expected of us, to respond to education and social pressure, to behave in an accepted way. In this process much that rightly belongs to the personality is lost, or rather it is not lost but has simply been pushed away into unconsciousness; in psychological terms it has been repressed. Small children left to behave naturally are often lustful, acquisitive, and aggressive, and show all the tendencies that the adult is supposed to have grown or been educated out of. But the mistake of most educators, parents, teachers, and others, is to believe that they have really changed the nature of the children in their care, while all that has happened is that the disagreeable or inferior tendencies have been pushed into the background and forgotten, yet live on in the adult. This forgetting is often so successful that we come to believe that we are exactly as we appear to be, sometimes with disastrous results. These repressed tendencies belong to what Jung calls the personal unconscious, and far from withering away, as one might hope, they seem to be like neglected weeds that flourish in any forgotten corner of the garden.

The process of civilizing the human being leads to a compromise between himself and society as to what he should appear to be, and to the formation of the mask behind which most people live. Jung calls this mask the persona, the name given to the masks once worn by the actors of antiquity to signify the role they played. But it is not only actors who fill a role; a man who takes up a business or a profession, a woman who marries or chooses a career, all adopt to some extent the characteristics expected of them in their chosen position; it is necessary to do so in order to succeed. A business man will try to appear (and even to be) forceful and energetic, a professional man intelligent, a civil servant correct; a professional woman nowadays needs not only to appear intelligent but also well dressed, and a wife is required to be a hostess, a mother, a partner, or whatever her husband’s position demands.

Society expects, and indeed must expect, every individual to play the part assigned to him as perfectly as possible, so that a man who is a parson … must at all times … play the role of parson in a flawless manner. Society demands this as a kind of surety: each must stand at his post, here a cobbler, there a poet. No man is expected to be both … that would be ‘odd’. Such a man would be ‘different’ from other people, not quite reliable. In the academic world he would be a dilettante, in politics an ‘unpredictable’ quantity, in religion a free-thinker — in short, he would always be suspected of unreliability and incompetence, because society is persuaded that only the cobbler who is not a poet can supply workmanlike shoes.1
The persona is a collective phenomenon, a facet of the personality that might equally well belong to somebody else, but it is often mistaken for individuality. The actor or artist with long hair and casual clothes is looked on as someone unique — a personality — while often in fact he has simply adopted the dress and habits of all the other artists of his group. The friendliness and hospitality of Mrs. So-and-So the vicar’s wife, seem to spring from her boundless good nature, but in reality she adopted these ways when she married her husband believing that ‘a vicar’s wife should be the friend of all who need her’. To some extent, it is true, people choose the roles for which they feel best fitted, and to this degree the persona is individual, but it is never the whole man or woman. Human nature is not consistent, yet in filling a role it must appear so, and is therefore inevitably falsified.

The persona, however, is a necessity; through it we relate to our world. It simplifies our contacts by indicating what we may expect from other people, and on the whole makes them pleasanter, as good clothes improve ugly bodies.

People who neglect the development of a persona tend to be gauche, to offend others, and to have difficulty in establishing themselves in the world. There is always the danger, however, of identifying oneself with the role one fills, a danger that is not obvious when the role is a good one and fits the person well. Yet we often say with some concern ‘he plays a part’ or ‘she is not really like that at all’, for we are at least partly aware of the danger of living in a way that is not true to our real natures. Perhaps some crisis will occur which calls for flexibility or a completely new way of reacting, or a human situation may be reached where the lack of a genuinely individual emotional response spells tragedy. Elizabeth Bowen describes such a situation in The Death of the Heart, where the adults in the story are so locked in their conventional roles that they fail completely to understand the needs of a sensitive adolescent girl. Another danger is that too rigid a persona means too complete a denial of the rest of the personality, and all those aspects which have been relegated to the personal or belong to the collective unconscious.

Jung calls that other side of ourselves, which is to be found in the personal unconscious, the shadow. The shadow is the inferior being in ourselves, the one who wants to do all the things that we do not allow ourselves to do, who is everything that we are not, the Mr. Hyde to our Dr. Jekyll. We have an inkling of this foreign personality when, after being possessed by an emotion or overcome with rage, we excuse ourselves by saying, ‘I was not myself’, or ‘I really don’t know what came over me’. What ‘came over’ was in fact the shadow, the primitive, uncontrolled, and animal part of ourselves. The shadow also personifies itself: when we particularly dislike someone, especially if it is an unreasonable dislike, we should suspect that we are actually disliking a quality of our own which we find in the other person.

Read More….

Lakota Instructions for Living

Native Americans

Lakota Instructions for Living

Friend do it this way – that is,
whatever you do in life,
do the very best you can
with both your heart and mind.

And if you do it that way,
the Power Of The Universe
will come to your assistance,
if your heart and mind are in Unity.

When one sits in the Hoop Of The People,
one must be responsible because
All of Creation is related.
And the hurt of one is the hurt of all.
And the honor of one is the honor of all.
And whatever we do effects everything in the universe.

If you do it that way – that is,
if you truly join your heart and mind
as One – whatever you ask for,
that’s the Way It’s Going To Be.

Passed down from White Buffalo Calf Woman

The Lakota

Sometimes also spelled “Lakhota,” this group consists of seven tribes who were known as warriors and buffalo-hunters. Sometimes called the Tetons, meaning “prairie dwellers,” the seven tribes include:
Ogalala (“they scatter their own,” or “dust scatterers”)
Sicangu or Brule (“Burnt Thighs”)
Hunkpapa (“end of the circle”),
Miniconjou (“planters beside the stream”),
Sihasapa or Blackfoot (Ntote confused with the separate Blackfoot tribe)
Itazipacola (or Sans Arcs: “without bows”)
Oohenupa (“Two Boilings” or “Two Kettle”)…

Read More…

Twelve plus One

Some notes on the number 12 plus one.

Many wisdom traditions teach that the wholeness of the soul is embodies by a matrix of consciousness compromising an integrated 12 into 13 harmonic of fundamental energies.  Such teachings rely on the use of symboll and metaphor to depict this understanding.  And so throughout the archetypal language of myth, in the journey of the solar – or soular – hero, the inner pilgrimage to wholeness, we repeatedly encounter these archetypal numbers.  Twelve companion deities surrounded Osiris, the ancient Egyptian God of regeneration.  Twelve followers accompanied the archetypal hero Odysseus, whose long journey home after the Trojan War was recounted by Homer.  Hercules the Greek hero undertook 12 labours to complete his mission and obtain freedom.  And Jesus whose birth we celebrate at the winter solstice – the rebirth of the sun – had 12 disciples.

This interweaving of 12 around one is reflected in the astronomical and astrological cycles of the Zodiac and the cosmic dance of the Sun, Moon, and Earth.  Each year the sun completes a cycle against the background of the 12 constellations of the zodiac.  And each year the Moon, as it circles the Earth, traces out 12 sidereal months as measured against the stellar background and 13 full moons or lunations.

The same harmonic is embedded within the musical notes of the chromatic scale, where, as we have seen, the 13th note both completes an octave – by doubling the frequency of the first note – and begins the next.  To the initiated musicians of Ancient Greece, the innate geometrical relationships embodied by the chromatic scale reflected cosmic principles of evolution and the embodiment of unity consciousness.

The ancient geometers depicted Spirit as a perfect sphere.  To them the embodiment of spirit in matter was further revealed by the greatest number of spheres able to be packed around a central sphere of the same size, being 12 around one.

It was these intuitive insights which reconciled so many ancient cultures in a common perception. –books.google.com

Twelve disciples plus Jesus

Each of the twelve [disciples] represented qualities of personality that belong to one individual, and Christ as you know him represented an individual earthly personality – the inner self – and twelve main characteristics connected with the egotistical self.  As Christ was surrounded by the disciples, so the inner self is surrounded by these physically oriented characteristics, each drawn outward toward daily reality on the one hand, and yet orbiting the inner self.
Seth Speaks, pg 205

Jesus is the Sun and the disciples represent the 12 basic patterns of human personality as revealed in the Zodiac.  This also applies to the 12 tribes of Israel and the 12 Angels.  Each disciple represents a character trait, such as Will, that when combined, produce the whole, Jesus. Character traits can be thought of as a belief in self pertaining to a particular trait.

Other references:
In the Revelation: the twelve gates of the celestial City (Rv 21,12); the twelve kinds of precious stone of the celestial City (Rv 21,19-20); the twelve stars of the crown that wears the woman (Rv 12,2); the trees of life, which bear twelve crops of fruit in a year, one in each month (Rv 22,2), the twelve eras that the Earth crosses in 26000 years. At each of the twelve cycles of the humanity would incarnate a rescuer, the twelve works of Hercules, the human cell has twelve biochemical salts, etc.

Twelve chakras plus the whole

Our energy fields are the combined energies of twelve vortex points which can be mapped to the character traits represented by the Zodiac or the disciples.  When energy blocks are removed (beliefs are removed), the energy flows as the whole (Jesus).

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Vibrational signatures of twelve chakras

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Sacred Geometry, Twelve plus one Solid

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Metatron’s Cube (12 circles around 1 center). This can produce the flower of life which also contains the patterns of the chakras.  ‘Drunvalo Melchizedek has called these figures symbols of sacred geometry, asserting that they represent ancient spiritual beliefs, and that they depict fundamental aspects of space and time.’

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There are 12 western astrological signs and 12 signs in the Chinese zodiac; 
12 planets ; 
12 ‘jyotirlingas’ in Hindu Shivaism; 
Surya, the Hindu sun god has 12 names and there are 12 petals in the heart chakra or ‘anahata’; 
There were 12 disciples or apostles in Christianity; 
12 Imams in Islam; 
There are 12 tribes of Israel; 
12 principal gods in the ancient Greek pantheon and 12 labours of Hercules;
The Norse god Odin had 12 sons; 
12 knights sat at the legendry King Arthur’s round table and he won 12 great battles against Saxon invaders; 
There are 12 months in the year; 
12 tones(black and white notes) in an octave…the list goes on and on
http://powerof3info.fatcow.com/?tag=12-chakras

Zen Poetry Excerpts

Excerpted from Just Use This Mind: Follow the Universal Truth to Oneness of Mind, Body and Spirit

Not die to the lifeless self,
then the immortal nature cannot come alive;
Not quite alive to the immortal,
then one has not quite died to the lifeless;
To live with what is alive and to die to what is dead is only half correct,
To die to the living so the dead come to life,
then the world will be at peace.

Move image, image moving,
image after image arising,
Water waves, waves on water,
ripple after ripple born,
Empty the mind,
the mind of emptiness,
Emptiness just is,
I am aware, aware of “I,”
“I” after “I” follows on.

Grievance must have a culprit, debt its creditor,
Name-calling is quite unnecessary,
The green hills already have many corpses,
Beholding grudge in the Light, then came the Dust.
– Shih, Miao Tsan

Who is seeing, who is listening, who is talking,
Spring flower, spring breeze, the Spirit’s beauty;
Not blind, not deaf, nor speechless,
No eye, no ears, yet wondrous in many ways.

Restless and hurried man pursues in suffering,
cold and warm the seasons passed one by one;
from morning to evening the householder makes a living,
deluded and disoriented the hair turned white;
right and wrong, what day will it all end?
Worried and perplexed, when can it cease?
Clearly and obviously there is a path to cultivate;
no matter what, regardless, people are unwilling to practice.

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